£15.00Price

MATCHA AT ITS FINEST​

PURE.

UMAMI.

FLAVOUR.

WHY DRINK IT?

Matcha is an incredible beverage and can be used for many different drinks and even for food. 

It is most commonly drunk with hot water as a concentrated green tea or hot milk can be added to produce an extremely creamy and naturally sweet Matcha Latte.

 

Matcha powder can also be sprinkled onto granola or cereal and can be added to hot chocolate for an exciting kick of flavour.

                                  MATCHA

                                        BREW GUIDE

Matcha Tea

Boil your kettle and leave for approximately

2 minutes for the water to cool to 80°C

Sieve 1 g of Matcha into a cup

Pour in 90 ml of 80°C water

Whisk vigorously in a 'W' motion until frothy

Savour and enjoy!

Matcha Latte

Boil your kettle and leave for approximately

2 minutes for the water to cool to 80°C

Sieve 1 g of Matcha into a cup

Pour in 40 ml of 80°C water

Whisk vigorously in a 'W' motion until frothy

Add 120 ml of hot milk

Enjoy your outrageously creamy and sweet Matcha latte!

Can be made with oat milk

and honey for extra tastiness!

FLAVOUR NOTES?

High quality Matcha will exhibit flavour notes

of pure umami.

At Unorthodox Roasters we use 100% ceremonial grade Matcha grown in the Chikushi Plain located in Yame, Japan. 

We love Matcha for its versatility and its smooth and natural sweetness that shines through the food and drink that it is added too.

WHAT IS MATCHA?

Matcha has been used for around 1000 years

and was originally consumed by Zen Buddhists  

in Japan for its medicinal purposes.

 

Matcha is made by grinding a green tea, known

as Tencha, into a fine green powder.

MATCHA

1 g

WATER  VOLUME

90 ml

TEMPERATURE

80°C

WHISK TIME

30 s

MATCHA

1 g

WATER  VOLUME

40 ml

MILK VOLUME

120 ml

TEMPERATURE

80°C

WHISK TIME

30 s

HOW IS IT MADE?

Fasten your seat belts because it is about to get complicated!

Matcha is made from the tea plant called Camellia Sinensis which is the same tea plant that makes your English Breakfast, Earl Grey, Lapsang Souchong and even your Chinese white tea.

Two weeks before the tea is harvested, it is placed in the shade which slows the growth and boosts the chlorophyll production resulting in the leaves becoming a rich green colour. After two weeks elapse, the top leaves and buds of the tea are harvested by hand and then quickly steamed to prevent oxidation and darkening of the leaves. 

The leaves can be rolled into Gyokuro tea but with Matcha they are laid out flat on tea beds to dry out completely. This becomes a product consisting of crumbly leaves known as Tencha.

The Tencha is then de-stemmed and de-veined and ground slowly in granite stone mills so that the tea does not burn due to friction. This process takes approximately 1 hour for every 30 grams of Tencha.

Eventually, the tea is completely ground into the fine green powder we know and love called Matcha.

The alter-ego of matcha is known as Sencha.

Sencha tea can follow exactly the same processes as matcha except it is grown entirely in the sunlight resulting in the tea becoming a yellowish colour. Although it is still a brilliant green tea, when in powder form, it exhibits a slight increase in bitterness when it is compared to authentic Japanese Matcha.